Andy

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  1. KL30 vs KLH6 and KLH 17

    Thanks for the correction on the model 30, I must have confused them with tthe smaller model 31 which would have had the 8 inch woofer.
  2. KL30 vs KLH6 and KLH 17

    Figure I'd add my two cents to this unanswered post......all 3 are nice models & produce quality sound - the model 6 is really on top, 10 inch woofer with largest magnet structure. In Henry Kloss's words, "everything was right about the model six". This speaker stayed in production for over 14 years for good reason. About $135. each new. The 17 was the lighter 10 inch woofer model with a smaller cabinet volume.. Really a great speaker with slightly less robust bass response then the model 6. About $80. each new. The model 30 came a little later (1971ish) and was a descendant of models 22,24,26 with the 8 inch woofer. It's ust going to have less presence then both other models, with the smaller woofer and cabinet. About $110 a pair new ? If you ever have a chance to buy the model 23's, buy them. KLH's best two-way speaker. Same woofer and cabinet volume as the three-way model 5 that go for big bucks these days. The 23's sold for about $160. each new. Today they are often under the radar and sell for very little. It's a super nice speaker with very strong bass response. Love this speaker ! !
  3. the holy grail/

    My choice is way out in left field and will hardly be considered a 'holy grail', but it's among the most important loudspeakers in audio history - the model that embodied what AR set out to do back in 1954, produce superb low distortion bass...yes, the humble AR-1W. Many of these are gone today since many were parted out or otherwise used in odd ways.......back in the 70s, a friend used four 1W's wired together as bass speakers in his rock band. Powered by a massive Edison movie theater amp. He was half crazy, but the result was really nice powerful bass ! Here's my AR article with a photo of my early 1955 1W (now long gone) http://www.antiqueradio.com/Oct06_Hayden_Acoustic.html
  4. KLH Woofer Surround Sealant

    Boreas; Your 17's look great and are indeed early ones - with SN's 12758 & 17303 this puts them in the first year of production, 1965. I figure KLH made at least 35,000 units a year of the model 17. They were produced until about 1970 -1 and I've seen serial numbers as high as 180,000. The 17 was repackaged into models 38 & 56 (basically the lighter 10 inch woofer which dated back to the model 10 of 1961). The last act of this superb woofer came with the model 56, circa 1976.....it sounded good, but the cabinet was a sad afair....thin mdf wrapped in vinyl. By this time, Radio shack was selling much nicer acoustic suspension speakers then KLH....all that ws left to do is sell this historic company to an Asian firm, which happened by 1979.
  5. KLH Woofer Surround Sealant

    Boreas; Your 17's look great and are indeed early ones - with SN's 12758 & 17303 this puts them in the first year of production, 1965. I figure KLH made at least 35,000 units a year of the model 17. They were produced until about 1970 -1 and I've seen serial numbers as high as 180,000. The 17 was repackaged into models 38 & 56 (basically the lighter 10 inch woofer which dated back to the model 10 of 1961). The last act of this superb woofer came with the model 56, circa 1976.....it sounded good, but the cabinet was a sad afair....thin mdf wrapped in vinyl. By this time, Radio shack was selling much nicer acoustic suspension speakers then KLH.
  6. KLH Model Two

    Thanks for the information and link to the auction. Certainly scarce with few produced. The cabinet construction is interesting - looks like a standard 3 or 4 ply plywood. I always thought the models one, two & three had the same 12-ply plywood like my model six has which are from early 1958. I believe the change to mdf came in 1959. I'm sure there were production changes in the first year or two at KLH with cost saving measures taking hold more and more as the years went on and the company grew. This can be seen with the model eight radio in 1963....changing from solid walnut cabinets, to veneered plywood and it's speaker being reduced from twin drivers to a single driver. In 1964 kLH went corporate when purchased by Singer. Still a quality audio maker, but now a mainstream operation. Andy
  7. KLH 28

    I remember those photos from five years ago - Wow, they have three of the large KLH woofers per cabinet as seen in the models 5, 12, & 23 ! They would have weighed a good 75 lbs. apiece and with a total of six drivers, and been able to handle tons of power.
  8. Interesting Model Thirteen. Prototype?

    Yet another interesting piece of KLH history found by kent. It seems that every once in awhile a pre-production, or production variation item surfaces with the KLH label. Never seen that.....thanks for sharing the photos. As I posted a couple of years ago - I bid on a model Thirteen with a solid walnut cabinet that was factory labeled "model eight stereophonic adapter" on the front panel ! Left a crazy bid of about $450., but was outbid *%#! Andy
  9. KLH 28

    Those are indeed a rare breed...very nice!! If my memory serves me, each loudspeaker has six drivers - Can you provisde any further deails...serial number, any frequencycontrols, etc. I think they're about 1970-71 ? When working properly, those must be one fantastic sounding pair of KLH's - great find !
  10. Just thought I'd bring to life a post from the past that never got a reply. Five years later I don't know if Nobbleserf ever found the elusive KLH models one, Two or Three ? These are pretty darn scarce.....I've only seen a model Two on ebay once in 10 years. If anyone has any of these first 3 KLH loudspeaker models from 1957-8......I'm sure I'm not the only one who would like to see a photo !
  11. A League of Their Own

    I'll just add for what it's worth that KLH did pay close antention to cone weight and you often see the weight in grams written on the front side of the cone - On the larger woofer models, 5,12 & 23 you'll see these weights....24.4, 25.7, 25.1, etc. Also mentioned in the 1958 AUDIO MAGAZINE article was a large reject pile on the factory floor at KLH ! I guess they were pretty picky on specs and standards.
  12. You may have seen this on an earlier post but anyway.....they had the same cabinet volume and woofer as the model Five giving them really nice solid bass response, the tweeter is pretty much the same as many other KLH models from the 1965-72 era. I've not seen spec sheets on it and was even absent from a 1968 KLH speaker line up ad ? All that being said, the twenty three was KLH's best two-way speaker.....I think they're great.
  13. A League of Their Own

    This early ad shows what made KLH loudspeakers so great ~ http://cgi.ebay.com/1960-KLH-stereo-speake...id=p3286.c0.m14 Most companies were outsourcing cones along with other parts. KLH even wound their own voice coils. This seller also has other kLH ads, including another from 1960 showing a finished cone. These type of ads are very unusual and shows what was important to the company.....making it yourself & making it the best ! This also reminds me of a review of KLH in 1958 by AUDIO MAGAZINE in which they took a guided tour of the production process. They were very impressed by what they saw, saying "KLH has set themselves apart from other manufactures with their vertically integrated production".
  14. Just wanted to add that I've seen a model thirteen with black KLH knobs and black feet, but only one. It likely was a customer request, or they were ordered via mail back in the early 60s from KLH to match a model Eights knobs. The Thirteen looks good with the black knobs.....nice job.
  15. Someone else on the forum will have to provide technical advice on how to go about the repairs needed on your model Fours. I can give a little history on them ~ The model Four was KLH's first full-range loudspeaker, and likely was on the market in late 1957 or early 1958. In a 1996 interview, Henry Kloss himself said of the Four, "the high frequency speaker is not one that we made. It was a unit made by GE, of all places. The best tweeter I could find happened to be one that came from GE. The Four was more expensive than the AR-1 and wildly competitive with it. I think it was $224. each. " (kloss - in 1996). CBS records adopted the model Four as their monitor speaker in about 1960. You don't see the model Four out there too often, production was much lower on them then on the models Six, Seventeen. Also, since they have the sealed cabinets, folks give up on them. It's an early KLH classic - good luck restoring them. Andy