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redpackman

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About redpackman

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  • Birthday July 12

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  1. Here is a photo of an early 60's Alnico woofer from an AR-3.
  2. I opened up an AR4x which, I believe was untouched since its creation. It's serial number: 84366 (1966, I believe). The crossover I opened up was the same as the picture EXCEPT the yellow wire running to the tweeter was on the level control's base, and conversely both wires running to terminal 2 on the level control were green. I understand that AR changed it's crossover design a few times and one of those changes was to run the tweeters out of phase with the woofers. Rumor or truth, I know not. All I know is that my speakers were apparently congruent with the crossover schematic posted above, not the photo.
  3. You asked for some photos of the progress of the rebuild. The original crossover with the wax dual cap which had shifted WAY off it's specified ratings. Time to get rid of them. New Erse poly-film caps. A view of the underside of the connecting bloc for the mid and tweeter (not often seen from this angle). Some wood restoration, before and after the oil rub. Boxes awaiting the drivers, and, of course the big alnico woofer that weighs about as much as a Thanksgiving turkey.
  4. Thanks for the info GD70!! Mine did not have the oil caps, but the old wax ones. I've posted pictures of them elsewhere with a discussion about using my very basic cap tester showing theme drifting hugely in the 57(?) years since they were installed. I've put in Erse's top film caps to replace them (which my lowly meter indicated were right on, btw). The woofers look and sound good. I've got the tweeters (both "popped" on one side but they have continuity) at a nationally known speaker repair establishment for their attention. I'll probably send the mids in, though I have sound in both of them that seems to keep up with the woofers, but it's hard to tell when the cabinet isn't all sealed up and because of the crossover point with sounds between 1000 and 5000 hz they hardly have a "full sound." I'm particularly apprehensive about dealing with the aluminum wiring to the mids and tweeters. I'm used to copper and soldering them no problem, but that stuff seems to be very spooky to deal with. Splice, crimp using some small aluminum tubing, aluminum solder (which seems to be nearly impossible to find, or it comes in $45 quantities)???? Not sure what direction to go.
  5. I was able to get a pair of AR3's this past weekend, and I'm in the midst of restoring them. I've already worked on 2x, 2ax, 3a's, 4x and 4 ax, 5, 6 and 7's. These will be a real challenge, I can see...aluminum wire and all. First things first: the serial numbers on the pair are 09040 and 09063. I'm assuming they are around 1960. Anyone have any information more specific than that? I've only opened one cabinet thus far and have found no dates stamped inside. I believe I'm the first one in since manufacture. Cleaning the tone controls, new Erse poly-film caps (6 uf and 24 uf) etc. BTW, short of sending them out, what's the technique Roy suggested for dealing with "petrified" mids? I have sound, but not sure it's what it should be. Lots of highs, but then the crossover, as I understand it, for the AR3 began at 1000 hz. Operating them through the crossover with less than 1 watt and less than full output through the mid control. Input appreciated.
  6. Thought you might find this interesting. This capacitor, removed from a very early 60's AR3 (Serial numbers in the 9xxx range). One can see how far a cap can "drift" in 58 years. The 24 uf cap is now over 60 and the 6 uf cap is around 10 uf. Now, i know my cap tester is hardly a tol model, but it's in the neighborhood.
  7. Picked up AR3 pair today. All looks good but one tweeter has "popped" its suspension. I'm either going to get it repaired or find a replacement. Looking for a genuine original so I can keep it a true AR3. If anyone has one they'd like to sell for a reasonable price, get back to me. Thanks.
  8. What difference would it make if instead of a 150 uf capacitor in the original AR3a schematic the capacitor was at 180 uf?
  9. Hard to tell on the before and after because I just replaced the caps and because of the hole someone drilled in the cabinet, I didn't spend a lot of time listening to how they'd sound "before." All I know is that when I was done, Mr. Allison's genius, once again became apparent. Allison's are remarkable speakers. They are not large, but the sound is fantastic. I've also restored some Allison 4's. Breathtaking. Best sound from a smaller speaker that I have ever heard. Enjoy. If you've got all the drivers working, you are in for a treat.
  10. It looks like an AR-2ax, and the badges attached to it identify it as such, but the tweeters have rear connectors and they are more flush mounted than any/most of the pictures of AR-2ax I've seen. Is this a late or early or radically modified AR-2ax or some other speaker?
  11. I picked these up at a local auction. Fortunately all the drivers were still functioning. So I restored them. The surrounds needed to be replaced, of course. Someone had drilled a hole in the back of the speakers to enable them to be hung from a wall (thus destroying the acoustic suspension system). I plugged the hole tightly. I replaced the 8 uf cap in the crossover (see picture). Then I used Howards Restore a Finish on the walnut veneer. Fabulous stuff for bringing old wood to life. These, by the dates on the woofers were from mid-1984. They sound spectacular. Very, very clear with wonderful, subtle bass. Allison's engineering genius is on display.
  12. I am working on a crossover for a DLK 2 speaker. One of the caps in the crossover is a 47 uf (the other two being a 4.7 uf and a 10uf). I'm planning on using mylar caps for the two lower value ones, which should work out nicely (4.7 and 10 uf). However, film caps at 47 uf are out of my price range. The supplier I am using does not have electrolytic caps with 47 uf values. They do have 40 uf, however. I am thinking of combining a 40 uf electrolytic with a 6.8 uf mylar to give me 46.8 uf theoretically. All the caps are rated higher (either 100 for the electrolytic to 150v for the mylar) than the originals, which were 50 v. So here's the question for you experts: Can I wire electrolytic and mylar caps in parallel to give me 46.8 uf, or is it unwise to use electrolytic and mylar caps together?
  13. I am working on a crossover for a DLK 2 speaker. One of the caps in the crossover is a 47 uf (the other two being a 4.7 uf and a 10uf). I'm planning on using mylar caps for the two lower value ones, which should work out nicely (4.7 and 10 uf). However, film caps at 47 uf are out of my price range. The supplier I am using does not have electrolytic caps with 47 uf values. They do have 40 uf, however. I am thinking of combining a 40 uf electrolytic with a 6.8 uf mylar to give me 46.8 uf theoretically. All the caps are rated higher (either 100 for the electrolytic to 150v for the mylar) than the originals, which were 50 v. So here's the question for you experts. Can I wire electrolytic and mylar caps in parallel to give me 46.8 uf or is it unwise to use electrolytic and mylar caps together?
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