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H H Scott speakers

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Hi, I just picked up a pair of scott s-15's at a yard sale for free. They sound quite good, but there seems to be a lack of information and interest on the web as compared to other new england speaker brands. There is plenty of interest in the tube components. I'm just wondering what the feeling is around here about the speakers.

Thanks

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Hi there;

I believe that I read something favourable about the Scott model S-10 speaker system many years ago.

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>Hi, I just picked up a pair of scott s-15's at a yard sale

>for free. They sound quite good, but there seems to be a lack

>of information and interest on the web as compared to other

>new england speaker brands. There is plenty of interest in the

>tube components. I'm just wondering what the feeling is

>around here about the speakers.

>

>Thanks

I bought a pair of HH Scott S-3s in 1961 (a friend worked at Scott and bought them for me at employee's discount). 3-way, 10" woofer, 5" mid-range, and 1 1/2" tweeter. They had a tuned port. The woofer and mid-range were marked as Danish-made. They sounded fine for me for many years but were shy on bass. The sore point were the tweeters which eventually failed (one early in life which was replaced under warranty). I eventually replaced the tweeters with Morel speakers which were drop-ins. Nicely constucted, very heavy. Fine walnut (veneer) cabinitry.

John

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Companies like HH Scott, Fisher, Marantz, Harmon Kardon, even later McIntosh which were predominantly manufacturers of electronics, amplifiers, preamplifiers tuners, receivers, etc. expanded to offer the market a full range of products so that a customer who wanted an entire system with one brand name on it had a choice. This even went so far as console type units and shelf type package systems, even portables. But as speaker manufacturers, they were never top tier. People looking for top performing equipment in any particular price bracket had better choices from companies which specialized in manufacturing speakers such as AR and KLH. While these other producers' products were not bad, they were never any real match for the heavy hitters. There is a reason why the top speaker manufacturers monopolized much of the component speaker market, their products just sounded better. It should be appreciated that those who had the money and knowledge to pass up Magnavox, Zenith, and RCA to consider electronics from Fisher and Scott also had the smarts to look at speakers from KLH and AR. They were not usually put off by having to mix and match brands especially since they were marketed that way in dealer showrooms.

On the other hand, speaker manufacturers sometimes branched out to offer electronics and package units themselves. KLH offered quite a number of systems whose electronics were a good match for their speakers up to about the level of KLH Model 17. They never pretended to offer an amplifier or receiver which could do full justice to models 5, 12, or even 6 and certainly nothing of use for 9. AR offered one turntable, one amplifier, and one receiver until about the mid 70s. These were intended to compete with high end units at much lower prices keeping consistant with AR's philosophy of offering state of the art equipment at the lowest possible cost. During the time they were marketed, there were few turntables or amplifiers at any price which could outperform AR's models in any meaningful way of value to the customer. The realities and psychology of the market in the 1960s and 1970s seems almost incomprehensible in light of today's market where high performance equipment by earlier standards are almost given away when prices are adjusted for inflation and so much excellent performing used equipment just isn't wanted anymore. Example, Pioneer SX 950 Receiver 85wpc, in perfect condition $10 at a garage sale about 3 or 4 years ago.

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Here is a bit more information about the S-3 speakers I purchased in the early 60s. According to the H.H. Scott Vintage Audio Archive, the S-3 measured 23.5"x11.75"x9.75" and cost $134.95. Later there was a S-10 with about the same dimensions (23.5"x11.75"x9") that sold for $69.95. What a price drop! Both have the same speaker complement and are described similarly (oiled walnut). Perhaps the Dynaco A-25 drove prices downwards.

John

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>Companies like HH Scott, Fisher, Marantz, Harmon Kardon, even

>later McIntosh which were predominantly manufacturers of

>electronics, amplifiers, preamplifiers tuners, receivers, etc.

>expanded to offer the market a full range of products so that

>a customer who wanted an entire system with one brand name on

>it had a choice. This even went so far as console type units

>and shelf type package systems, even portables. But as

>speaker manufacturers, they were never top tier. People

>looking for top performing equipment in any particular price

>bracket had better choices from companies which specialized in

>manufacturing speakers such as AR and KLH............................................................................................................................................................>

>On the other hand, speaker manufacturers sometimes branched

>out to offer electronics and package units themselves. KLH

>offered quite a number of systems whose electronics were a

>good match for their speakers up to about the level of KLH

>Model 17................................................................................................

I hope that you don't mind my editing; I tried to save the salient points.

Back in the early seventies, I remember several companies offered 'compact' stereos, a la KLH. Many of them had turntables that were superior to the Garrards that KLH used. Scott, Kenwood, and some others made units that had a Dual, a P-E, or a Miracord turnable built in. Scotts of course could be bought with Scott speakers, and in other cases people would buy the speakers separately, meaning they got KLH's, Dynaco's, etc.

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Hi, I just picked up a pair of scott s-15's at a yard sale for free. They sound quite good, but there seems to be a lack of information and interest on the web as compared to other new england speaker brands. There is plenty of interest in the tube components. I'm just wondering what the feeling is around here about the speakers.

Thanks

I recently purchased a pair of S-15s. I have been unable to find much info also. I can say, they sound really good for older speakers. I have had an issue with one woofer, so I have a spare on the way. I have the Scott's paired up with a newer set of Klipsch KSB 3.1s, driven by a vintage Pioneer SX-D7000 receiver. The receiver is rated at 120 watts, so I can't really crank. I'm happy with them and the sound quality is excellent.

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I recently purchased a pair of S-15s. I have been unable to find much info also. I can say, they sound really good for older speakers. I have had an issue with one woofer, so I have a spare on the way. I have the Scott's paired up with a newer set of Klipsch KSB 3.1s, driven by a vintage Pioneer SX-D7000 receiver. The receiver is rated at 120 watts, so I can't really crank. I'm happy with them and the sound quality is excellent.

Those Scotts are from the late-60's to the mid-70's. Those and the S-10s were two of the more accurate moderately priced speakers of the day. They have excellent build quality, including the enclosure. The S-10s were rated as top performers by Consumer Reports, based on flat response. Assuming they haven't been damaged, you've got yourself some fine speakers.

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