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Would there be any value or interest in collecting contributor comments on recordings they own to cover topics like;

RECORDINGS FOR SELECTING Speakers.

Best of Classical, Popular etc recordings that "must be heared" on your sound system to be believed?

A format for responses could included:

1 - Recording details.

2 - Why I like the recording.

3 - What to listen for in the recording.

Obviously there would be work involved for the administrator and programmer, but this could be managed by setting limits to size and duration of comments about the recordings.

Just a thought!

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Guest

>Best of Classical, Popular etc recordings that "must be heared" on your sound system to be believed?<

I could go for something like this. I'm not sure how much I could contribute. The only thing that concerns me is that we probably use so many different criteria to judge.

For instance - I like the Alan Parson's Project's "Turn of a Friendly Card." It is way over-produced, among other things. So would this be a "good" recording to cite? I think it reveals a lot about an audio system; as do a lot of Mannheim Steamroller recordings. But are they "great recordings?" I don't think the editors for various magazines would think so.

And then there are the "performances" that people love deeply regardless of the recording.

Do you think we could pull it off, or would we just be showing our taste?

Bret

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Guest Jstas

I don't think it would be too difficult. Certainly if a reader did not like the artist who created the recording, they would not have to use it. It's not like this would be the end-all, be-all of that kind of a list. It's a suggestion and given the fact that there is a large amount of knowledge and experience on the subject at this forum, it would offer insight into what those who have figured out what they are looking for use to audition equipment.

I think it would be a good reference. I think that critiques about the artists should be left aside and comments and reasoning on the actual recording properties would be the best way to go. That way no feathers get ruffled too bad. Also, I have found that even bad recordings can have thier own characteristics that can help you determine the performance capabilities, quirks and anomalies of a system.

I'm all for it! I think its a good idea and has merit.

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Well .. let me get this started then.

Clearly, the best recordings of all time belong to Tool. But, if you want some other opinions .. ;)

http://www.sunfire.com/demos/index.html

I thought I had more links than that, but that's all I can find right now. I know Chet Baker (Jazz) is very popular as a demo CD. Anita Baker(sp?) the R&B artist as well.

And Steve Winwood .. hmn ..

Mark

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Oh man .. what am I doing forgetting to mention Mickey Hart's Planet Drum. One of my roommates in college must have liked it too, since it long since walked out of my collection.

Too bad for him it doesn't quite sound the same on an Aiwa boombox with bright blue blinking lights as it did on my AR-3's. ;)

Mark

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Guest Bret

My interpretation of what we’re talking about here is great speaker-selection music, not necessarily great music and not necessarily “accurate” recordings. I see the implied paradox, but for me the logic holds-up if the question is rephrased a little to, “What can I do to a speaker to show its strengths and, more importantly, to expose its weaknesses?”

Those of us who listen well (I include myself only to make the point, modesty would prevent it otherwise) can hear subtleties that take an extended listening session to properly assess or appreciate. Often the question there becomes, “Am I hearing exactly what was laid-down on tape or something different?”

Unfortunately for us all, we really have no good way to ascertain if what was played was miked well, or if it was “played-with” by the engineer or goofed-around with in the final mix.

To give anyone I’ve lost a for-instance; maybe there was a drum recorded such that it would be 108db to the vocalist’s 90db, then the two are mixed-down such that the drum is “behind” the vocalist. When the vocalist is reproduced at 90db the drum is playing at 85db. When they do that sort of thing they introduce a “falseness” to the sound of the drum. A drum sounds very different when struck hard than if it is struck less-hard. So to have a quiet drum that’s being hammered for all the drummer’s worth “just ain’t right” and gets in the way of the hi-fi-ness of the recording.

Same thing’s true with brass and reeds, less so with a bowed instrument, but true nevertheless.

Then you have to compensate for what *you* think a particular instrument sounds like, by which I mean a French horn sounds very different up-close than it sounds from 30 rows back, center-stage. If you think of a French horn as being semi-blatty, somewhat metallic, and almost out-of-tune sounding, then hearing a French horn’s mellow, directionless tone from a distance isn’t going to “sound right” to you.

There is simply no way to tell how hi-fi a recording is unless you were there when it was made and have a tremendous auditory memory. So what we’re judging is our impression of how “hi” the “fi” really is. And just what does Frank Zappa’s fuzz guitar work really sound like, anyway?

All of that was a pre-emptive defense of my opinions. I appreciate your patience reading through it and I promise not to repeat it as I add to the list as things strike me as terrific speaker obstacle courses.

Here goes nothin'.

Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire VI - “Twilight at Rhodes”

The speakers should “vanish” with an impressively sized image. Electronic. If you can pinpoint the source, something’s wrong.

Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire 7 - “The 7 Metals of Alchemy”

See “Twilight at Rhodes” and add that if at some point the bric-a-brac isn’t in danger of leaving the shelves, even at modestly loud volumes, something is missing. This piece should really reveal both the depth and control of seriously low bass in addition to revealing how "wide" the image can go. Also, there is an interesting hollowness to a particular synthesizer voice which is too prominent and thin in lesser speakers. All-in-all a very interesting recording.

If anyone finds the picks interesting I'll provide more as they occur to me.

Bret

CAD doesn't improve everything.

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Guest Bret

>I'm all for it! I think its a good idea and has merit.<

But that was before I got ahold of it !

I'll prove it. I thought of another great speaker-workout CD.

Let me be VERY clear on this: Remove all impressionable women, children, and housepets before trying this one. It is full of seriously adolescent references to "naughty bits" and the things generally done with them along with language that befits Richard Pryor. . .

Parental Advisory.

Frank Zappa's "Joe's Garage". The whole thing, but in particular the first band, is full of acoustic and esoteric percussion, miked close, and recorded hot. I find Zappa highly entertaining (when nobody else is home) musically, but usually the recordings aren't this, this, this, "whimsical." (I'm starting to sound like a self-important reviewer. I'd better go back to my day-job.)

Oh, as an aside; A couple of days ago I noticed that "The Yes Album" had been released as a digital remaster. I couldn't help myself and bought what must be my fifth copy of that music. My review of the remaster: Buy it. Yea! Someone remastered one without changing it!

It's great to not only be able to tell exactly what cymbal Bill Bruford is hitting, but *how hard* and with what sort of stick, back side of a brush - and it all sounds very plausible.

Hunky Dory (David Bowie) in 24-bit digital remaster is okay. I think they did more than expand the dynamic range and uncompress, tho. Where the original recording used to sound squeezed, it comes-off sounding truncated to me, like they removed some content along with the noise. But the voice is much more natural.

Some things just don't bear improving very well - "The Answer" from The Moody Blues didn't really need the vocals put back in tune.

Bret

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>Here goes nothin'.

Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire VI - “Twilight at Rhodes” ...

Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire 7 - “The 7 Metals of Alchemy”...

If anyone finds the picks interesting I'll provide more as they occur to me.<

Bret,

A couple of exotic choices. In “Twilight at Rhodes” right near the end there is a very soft synthesizer sound way in the background. At first I thought it was tape hiss from the Master Tape. But it is definitely from a synthesizer, it modulates. Can hear it better with headphones.

“…an interesting hollowness to a particular synthesizer voice which is too prominent and thin in lesser speakers.” Not sure what you mean by “…too prominent and thin…” seems like a contradiction to me.

Anyway, listening to “The 7 Metals of Alchemy” through LSTs in my stereo/family room I can get a sense of “surround sound” like I’m standing in the middle of the music instead of it coming from just in front of me. Says a lot about the capability of these speakers, as this room has rather poor psychoacoustics. Like to FEEL the bass in this one as well.

Just for grins, listen to these through headphones. Reminiscent of Iron Butterfly’s “In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida” The way the music swirls around your head.

Do you have the complete Mannheim Steamroller collection (I – 8)? Christmas collection? Also, do you have any of the other artists that recorded for the American Gramaphone label?

Rich Laski

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First, here’s a link to fairly comprehensive list of one speaker manufacturer’s reference recordings.

http://www.audioc.com/information/recordings.htm I’ve never seen or heard this manufacturer’s speakers, so I’m not in any way promoting or endorsing their products. I’m only providing a link to this manufacturer’s list of reference recordings.

For years, I’ve considered the very first recording mentioned, Cowboy Junkies, "The Trinity Sessions" an absolutely “must have” precisely for the reasons described in the link. In addition to track 1, track 2, "Misguided Angel" and track 11, "Postcard Blues" are also outstanding. When everything is exactly right in your system, Margo Timmins’ voice will make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

I have the Steely Dan, "Katy Lied" LP listed as a reference recording on the link above.

Also on the list, I recently purchased the Allison Moorer, "Miss Fortune" CD. For all you recording engineers, please note: “Absolutely No vocal tuning or pitch correction used in the making of this record.”

A few more recordings for testing/selecting speakers I have and use include:

1) Telarc Digital recording of the 1812 Overture. I have the LP and CD. It’s the cannons and the bells.

2) Sheffield Labs, Amanda McBroom and Lincoln Mayorga, "Growing Up in Hollywood Town." I have the LP and CD of this also. Track 8, "Amanda," is very dynamic.

If you ever wanted to determine for yourself, with your system, “Which is better, analog (LP) or digital (CD)?” playing both versions of the above will convince you.

3) Pink Floyd, "Dark Side of the Moon." 30th Anniversary remaster just released on SACD and 180 gram LP.

Go here to find out why. http://store.acousticsounds.com/darkside.cfm (maked sure you check out the "related articles") and http://www.highfidelityreview.com/reviews/...number=19939611

A couple of limited edition LPs:

4) The only thing made by Mark Levinson I could ever afford. An LP simply titled “Volume One.” Side A is a live recording of a pipe organ solo of J.S. Bach, The Six Schubler Chorales. Very demanding of a system. If your speakers are harsh or bright in the mid/high frequency, you may be brought to tears listening to this recording. Some of the passages are rather bright as pipe organs sometimes can be. From the jacket: “ This record reproduces clearly the sound of the concert hall and the “air” or “space” around the music itself.” Even more so than the spatial ambiance in Cowboy junkies, "The Trinity Sessions" above. I’m not a big fan of pipe organ music, but it you don’t get the sense you are sitting in the concert hall, or more correctly, in a very large church or cathedral with marble floors something is missing.

5) "The Direct to Disc Sound of The Glenn Miller Orchestra," Directed by Jimmy Henderson. This is a limited edition, Direct to Disc recording made by The Great American Gramophone Company (No master tapes, the Pyral Master Recording Disks were cut “live”). From the jacket: “ From start to finish the entire engineering team went to great lengths to preserve the integrity of this record performance. Microphones that would compliment the sections being recorded were carefully selected so that a minimum amount of equalization would be used. The cutting amplifiers were Neumann SAL 74’s driving Neumann SX 74 cutterheads mounted on VMS 70 lathes. We think you will find this recording to be free from the coloration typical of the electronic recording process.” Exactly! And if they didn’t get it right, the entire side had to be recut, from the beginning.

Two female vocal recordings that are exceptional (IMHO) to just sit and listen to:

6) Carol King, “Tapestry,” Just put it on and enjoy. One of the best recordings of all time.

7) Judy Collins, “Colors of the Day.” Just purchased the DCC Compact Classics Gold CD version. FAR superior to the original LP and CD.

Rich Laski

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Another good recording to use as a test is Janis Ian: Breaking Silence.

http://store.acousticsounds.com/store.cfm?...6045&do=detail

It is an all analog recording and it is soooooooo good! Another good test is Copland: Fanfare for the Comman man. http://store.acousticsounds.com/store.cfm?...=6007&do=detail

Lots of realy loud strong passages, this is a super recording.

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Guest Bret

> Not sure what you mean by “…too prominent and thin…” seems like a contradiction to me.<

In the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, there is a passage where the heros are being tortured by the Vogon captain of a spaceship... by being read his poetry. (whilst strapped into poetry appreciation chairs) After deciding to throw them into space for misinterpreting his motive for writing poetry in the first place, he mockingly comments to himself about their review of his poem.

". . .'counterpoint the surrealism of the underlying metaphor' . . . Death's too good for them."

I feel like death's too good for me when I try to describe the qualities of a sound. In this case "prominent" means "honky" and "thin" means too one-dimensional, not airy enough, lacking those details that make a sound "hollow," or "open" or, __________. (add your own adjective here)

>like I’m standing in the middle of the music<

Cool.

>Like to FEEL the bass in this one<

Yeah, that's a thing I like about synthesizers. Not much in nature really gets down there and just sorta hangs-out for a while; organs being the exception.

>Just for grins, listen to these through headphones.<

Okay.

>Do you have the complete Mannheim Steamroller collection (I – 8)?<

Yes. Duplicates of several, LP and CD. And the "Romance" CD and. . .there's another one. . . oh yeah, "Mannheim Steamroller Meets the Mouse."

>Christmas collection?<

Yes, including the live Christmas performance, and I've seen them doing the Christmas show live.

>Also, do you have any of the other artists that recorded for the American Gramaphone label?<

Only the Mason Williams with M.S., as far as I know. But my LP collection is crated and stored, so I may be fibbing.

Bret

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Guest Bret

Got another "hit" for everyone and a "miss."

The remastered Steely Dan's ShowbizKids is worth the money and then some. You can hear the recordings get better over time, but listen to it from the beginning because you never heard that old stuff sound so good.

Aja? Already awesome, this is still an improvement. I won't embarrass myself by saying too much, but the recording is . . . definitely worth having.

And the miss:

Remastered "Going For the One," Yes's album with the amazingly amazing "Awaken." (Beethoven-like soaring orchestral chords that just go up and up and up and spread wings and fly. . .) Anyhow - there just isn't enough on the CD. It's a tremendous amount "better" but it still stinks. The engineer was able to do great things with some tracks and almost nothing to others and it comes-out sounding unbalanced. "If a synthesizer sounds like "A," then a pipe organ ought to sound like "B" and it doesn't."

Bret

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>Would there be any value or interest in collecting

>contributor comments on recordings they own to cover topics

>like;

>RECORDINGS FOR SELECTING Speakers.

>Best of Classical, Popular etc recordings that "must be

>heared" on your sound system to be believed?

>

>A format for responses could included:

>1 - Recording details.

>2 - Why I like the recording.

>3 - What to listen for in the recording.

>

>Obviously there would be work involved for the administrator

>and programmer, but this could be managed by setting limits to

>size and duration of comments about the recordings.

>

>Just a thought!

A great thought to be sure.

I have followed several magazine reviews over the years. When speakers are being tested they usually use cd's or vinyl. I had my experience with direct recorded records at a premium price, play once or twice and a "crackling rose" comes out. I listen to cd's and with no pops or ticks to worry about. I have read many preferences for vinyl today and all of its virtues. My frustration with my noisy vinyls not being played is offset by my wide use of my cd's. If for example the soundtrack from the movie Casper has some extremely nice deep bass if your woofer can woof. Try to hear Cat Stevens or Dean Peers. When I unpack in a few months I will have a list of particularly nice music examples to list for you. Stereophile usually lists 10 or so cuts they use per testing session. A number of soundtracks from movies are really enjoyable. Have a great day.

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Hello

I have un-packed some more of my collection of stuff.

As I mentioned previously, magazines such as Stereophile, list several tracks that they use for reference when they review stereo equipment.

Over the years when I had the money and opportunity I would listen and sometimes buy their reference cd's.

Our local highend cd store, The Magic Flute, allows us to try them out before buying.

On one of their test cd's, Disc 1 or 2 or 3, a Deen Peer plays a special cut with, a special guitar. I don't play any musical instrument but there is a story on how he de-tunes his guitar. I loved the sampler and bought his cd's.

The movie Casper has some cuts that are well worth listening to.

We may overlook this type of movie and definitely don't always pick up the subtle background music while we are watching them.

Patriot Games is another great example of dynamics.

For the moment, I don't remember the name of a film with Bruce Willis as a demoted river cop.

His partner was Sarah Jessica Parker (Sex in The City).

Where was I now.

Oh yeh.

I remember trying to find the soundtrack but I wasn't successful even finding one. It seemed to be another good one.

Jumanji is a movie shot here in Vancouver with an interesting soundtrack.

Jennifer Warnes, The Hunter, is outstanding.

Cat Stevens is great.

I have a hankering for an "Elizabeth Seranade" or "Elizathan Serenade" recorded by a choir with bells galore recorded about 25 - 30 years ago.

I seem to feel it was a German recording for some reason.

The only comment from my brother is its by James Last.

I have heard a copy of the James Last version but it's not the one I am seeking. Unless there is more than one James Last version.

I plan on scanning my database list of the good, the bad and the ugly cd's for your perusal in the very near future. I will bring the file here for you to download. I think you will find some of them interesting.

I'm scratching my head, there is a Japanese Kodo Drum cd and they warn you about the volume level.

If you aren't sure what I'm talking about, in the movie, The Rising Sun with Sean Connery, there was a party in the highrise office tower. There was a demonstration of this type of drum.

You sure could get your frustration out beating on these I'm sure. lol

I believe the CD was recorded in an enlarged studio, because they couldn't get the largest drums in through the regular doorways or something like that.

My list is several hundred cd's with some duplicates and typos I'm sure.

You sure might want to consider fusing your speakers before venturing too far.

Have a great night.

>>Would there be any value or interest in collecting

>>contributor comments on recordings they own to cover topics

>>like;

>>RECORDINGS FOR SELECTING Speakers.

>>Best of Classical, Popular etc recordings that "must be

>>heared" on your sound system to be believed?

>>

>>A format for responses could included:

>>1 - Recording details.

>>2 - Why I like the recording.

>>3 - What to listen for in the recording.

>>

>>Obviously there would be work involved for the administrator

>>and programmer, but this could be managed by setting limits

>to

>>size and duration of comments about the recordings.

>>

>>Just a thought!

>

>A great thought to be sure.

>

>I have followed several magazine reviews over the years. When

>speakers are being tested they usually use cd's or vinyl. I

>had my experience with direct recorded records at a premium

>price, play once or twice and a "crackling rose" comes out. I

>listen to cd's and with no pops or ticks to worry about. I

>have read many preferences for vinyl today and all of its

>virtues. My frustration with my noisy vinyls not being played

>is offset by my wide use of my cd's. If for example the

>soundtrack from the movie Casper has some extremely nice deep

>bass if your woofer can woof. Try to hear Cat Stevens or Dean

>Peers. When I unpack in a few months I will have a list of

>particularly nice music examples to list for you. Stereophile

>usually lists 10 or so cuts they use per testing session. A

>number of soundtracks from movies are really enjoyable. Have a

>great day.

>

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>Hello

>

>I have un-packed some more of my collection of stuff.

>

>As I mentioned previously, magazines such as Stereophile, list

>several tracks that they use for reference when they review

>stereo equipment.

>

>Over the years when I had the money and opportunity I would

>listen and sometimes buy their reference cd's.

>

>Our local highend cd store, The Magic Flute, allows us to try

>them out before buying.

>

>On one of their test cd's, Disc 1 or 2 or 3, a Deen Peer plays

>a special cut with, a special guitar. I don't play any musical

>instrument but there is a story on how he de-tunes his guitar.

>I loved the sampler and bought his cd's.

>

>The movie Casper has some cuts that are well worth listening

>to.

>

>We may overlook this type of movie and definitely don't always

>pick up the subtle background music while we are watching

>them.

>

>Patriot Games is another great example of dynamics.

>

>For the moment, I don't remember the name of a film with Bruce

>Willis as a demoted river cop.

>

>His partner was Sarah Jessica Parker (Sex in The City).

>

>Where was I now.

>

>Oh yeh.

>

>I remember trying to find the soundtrack but I wasn't

>successful even finding one. It seemed to be another good

>one.

>

>Jumanji is a movie shot here in Vancouver with an interesting

>soundtrack.

>

>Jennifer Warnes, The Hunter, is outstanding.

>

>Cat Stevens is great.

>

>I have a hankering for an "Elizabeth Seranade" or "Elizathan

>Serenade" recorded by a choir with bells galore recorded about

>25 - 30 years ago.

>

>I seem to feel it was a German recording for some reason.

>

>The only comment from my brother is its by James Last.

>

>I have heard a copy of the James Last version but it's not the

>one I am seeking. Unless there is more than one James Last

>version.

>

>I plan on scanning my database list of the good, the bad and

>the ugly cd's for your perusal in the very near future. I will

>bring the file here for you to download. I think you will find

>some of them interesting.

>

>I'm scratching my head, there is a Japanese Kodo Drum cd and

>they warn you about the volume level.

>

>If you aren't sure what I'm talking about, in the movie, The

>Rising Sun with Sean Connery, there was a party in the

>highrise office tower. There was a demonstration of this type

>of drum.

>

>You sure could get your frustration out beating on these I'm

>sure. lol

>

>I believe the CD was recorded in an enlarged studio, because

>they couldn't get the largest drums in through the regular

>doorways or something like that.

>

>My list is several hundred cd's with some duplicates and typos

>I'm sure.

>

>You sure might want to consider fusing your speakers before

>venturing too far.

>

>Have a great night.

>

>

>>>Would there be any value or interest in collecting

>>>contributor comments on recordings they own to cover topics

>>>like;

>>>RECORDINGS FOR SELECTING Speakers.

>>>Best of Classical, Popular etc recordings that "must be

>>>heared" on your sound system to be believed?

>>>

>>>A format for responses could included:

>>>1 - Recording details.

>>>2 - Why I like the recording.

>>>3 - What to listen for in the recording.

>>>

>>>Obviously there would be work involved for the

>administrator

>>>and programmer, but this could be managed by setting limits

>>to

>>>size and duration of comments about the recordings.

>>>

>>>Just a thought!

>>

>>A great thought to be sure.

>>

>>I have followed several magazine reviews over the years.

>When

>>speakers are being tested they usually use cd's or vinyl. I

>>had my experience with direct recorded records at a premium

>>price, play once or twice and a "crackling rose" comes out.

>I

>>listen to cd's and with no pops or ticks to worry about. I

>>have read many preferences for vinyl today and all of its

>>virtues. My frustration with my noisy vinyls not being

>played

>>is offset by my wide use of my cd's. If for example the

>>soundtrack from the movie Casper has some extremely nice

>deep

>>bass if your woofer can woof. Try to hear Cat Stevens or

>Dean

>>Peers. When I unpack in a few months I will have a list of

>>particularly nice music examples to list for you.

>Stereophile

>>usually lists 10 or so cuts they use per testing session. A

>>number of soundtracks from movies are really enjoyable. Have

>a

>>great day.

>>

>

Well, finally here is my partial list of CD's from my database.

It is not complete or perfect but most all were recommended or used in hifi test reports over the years.

I did have a more extensive list on paper but some were records and I am only now interested in CD's.

Not everything here is great stuff, but, Jennifer Warnes' The Hunter, is particularly nice.

Also the soundtrack from, Casper The Movie, Patriot Games and others.

This file when I downloaded it, was less than 100k in size and comes up in Word and prints out on 3 1/3 pages.

In the future I will try to re-do and update the list and perhaps comment on them.

As I update, I will download the full updated file.

I do notice some I own are not listed or the title is truncated.

Let us see in the new year if I can do better.

784.txt

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Well I'll be.

The file I am trying to download is *.rtf and as you can see I am not having much success.

Back to the drawing board.

I'll be back.

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>Well I'll be.

>

>The file I am trying to download is *.rtf and as you can see I

>am not having much success.

>

>Back to the drawing board.

>

>I'll be back.

Well here I am again.

This time I'll try *.zip.

787.zip

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My personal favorite test piece is "Explosive Brass Impact, Vol. 2",

Warren Kime, Command Records. Forget the date, early mid 60's. Also test with "Exodus" too.

Good list Vern.

James

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>My personal favorite test piece is "Explosive Brass Impact,

>Vol. 2",

>Warren Kime, Command Records. Forget the date, early mid 60's.

> Also test with "Exodus" too.

>

>Good list Vern.

>

>James

Thank you.

Now I will add these to my list and I will try to see if a CD of each is available.

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Hi Vern,

Messages from the system to you have been bouncing - please check your email account. The error refers to your infoserve mailbox exceeding the allowable size.

Thanks!

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>Vern,

>

>C&C Music Factory, "Gonna Make You Sweat", Columbia, CK

>47093.

>

>BTW Explosive Brass Impact is RS 919 SD.

>

>James

Thank you, James.

I'll add these to the list.

I will also check earlier write-ups regarding recommended songs.

Thank you again and have a great new year.

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>>Vern,

>>

>>C&C Music Factory, "Gonna Make You Sweat", Columbia, CK

>>47093.

>>

>>BTW Explosive Brass Impact is RS 919 SD.

>>

>>James

>

>

>Thank you, James.

>

>I'll add these to the list.

>

>I will also check earlier write-ups regarding recommended

>songs.

>

>Thank you again and have a great new year.

I've just gone back to the beginning of this topic and copied each music title you have included.

Thank you guys and gals.

I was on ebay a month or so ago and saw a pair of speakers being offered.

My eyes lit up as I have wanted a a pair of these for decades.

There was a brief write-up and a path to our website to a topic I had downloaded some literature to.

Shows how highly thought of this website is and obviously there wasn't a better source.

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