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Joel

AR9 woofers

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I just finished putting my AR3's together. The AR3 woofer's have a nice syrupy movement when I push on them, so I know the cabinets are well sealed.

I decided to take a look at my AR9s, but I'm having trouble telling if the seal is good enough.

I would assume the woofers will move differently because the two are working against each other. If I push on one side, the other moves out with it, but also pops back immediately. Is that normal, or should the opposite side stay pushed out until I release?

Thanks.

-Joel

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It seems that seal is not perfect. I can´t remember how well sealed my AR9´s were in the 80`s. But maybe you should first try to check that there are no loose mounting screws, as there are quite many of them in AR9 enclosure. Do not over tighten screws, as especially woofer chassis can flex if over tightened.

Best Regards

Kimmo

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You have an air leak. Most likely it is between the woofer and the cabinet. Personally I like the black double sided tape Parts Express sells for this purpose. It is cheap and easy to use. I do not like putty. The putty in the AR2as I acquired had turned to glue. It took me several hours with a tool I fashioned to get enough of it out to remove the woofers. The putty in original Bose 901 hardened and cracked. Instead of removing 18 drivers I used clear GE silicone caulk to carefully seal the joints between the speaker frames and the wood and the screw heads. This is also cheap and easy to work with but takes about a day to cure, the tape works immediately. The GE silicone is also easy to remove if that's needed. Just be sure it isn't older than its use by date. If it is, volatile solvents in the mixture will have evaporated and the caulk will never cure. I found that out the hard way on another project. I had to call GE about it. Also be sure never to get any on the cones or suspensions. I think it's pretty safe and use my fingers to help form it before it cures. I just make certain to wash my hands immediately afterwards. So far none of my fingers have fallen off as a result of using it.

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White colored putty is not correct for this work. But if white is OK, I have used Sika brand acrylic based Sikacryl seam sealing putty as glue and sealer in duties like this.. It is lot easier to work, less messy and maybe even cheaper than silicone putty. Sikacryl can be painted when cured and curing takes 8-24 hours. I suppose any other brand will also work.

Most silicone sealers do withstand higher temperatures, so they are more suitable for mounting resistors and other components that will become hot when operated.

Best Regards

Kimmo

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I went back and resealed the woofers with duct seal compound. The lower mid on one speaker also needed to be resealed. The difference in the bass response is pretty noticeable. I've always thought that my AR9's bass didn't live up to some of the descriptions I hear, and now I know why.

My daughter has a pair of AR90's, and when I get a change I am going to check the seal on her speakers. I remember that the 90's have an unusual screw head on the woofers. Can anyone tell me what screw driver I will need?

-Joel

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