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Bozak speakers


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#1 Guest_max843_*

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 02:54 PM

I just know that my father said he bought one from Mr. Bozak, who worked on them in his garage, I think in Buffalo, NY, where we lived at the time. This was the late 1940s. It looked like half a grapefruit, rounded on the back, about 2 1/2 to 3 feet high. My brother still has them. My father was so excited when he brought the first one home, having us listen for the sound of the triangle in the symphony orchestra! Later, when stereo appeared, Dad found another matching speaker at a yard sale. Sublime heaven....

#2 real1shepherd

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 04:04 AM

"I don't think anyone else had a similar marketing strategy. Personally, I thought the Concert Grand was an excellent sounding speaker which had a big clean open fairly accurate sound. They were usually paired with the best amplifiers available, McIntosh and Marantz. They were also expensive and large and beyond the budget of most people. The smaller units were less impressive to me."

Yes and I would put the 'Concert Grands' on a similar level with Altec Lancing 'Voice Of The Theater'. Heard them both with all kinds of music material driven by big Macs (no pun intended). You just needed a mansion or a room the size of a gym.;-) Both where fabulous speakers systems of the day, but by their very design, efficiency and space required-dated them as of the late 60's.

#3 real1shepherd

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 04:35 PM

I actually have very fond memories of Bozak. When I was very little, my parents went to the great expense to have a 'built in' system installed in the lighting shelves of various rooms around the house. I can't remember much about the equipment other than it was tube-I'm thinking Fisher and the turntable pulled out on ball bearing, you put a LP on and then pushed it back (carefully!) into its enclosure. After 8 track came out and cassettes, my parents lost interest in the system. Dad sold it to a business associate for pennies on the dollar..*sigh*. Anyway, the speakers remained permanently flush mounted in the lighting shelves. I was able to 'break into' them from the attic when I became interested in audio/music. What I found were Bozak drivers and xovers.

No Net in those days but got an address off the speakers themselves. I sent one in for repair because I managed to ruin a cone. Not only did they send it back fully repaired, but they sent me directions on how to build my own custom enclosures. I had a cabinet shop cut all the wood exactly as directed by Bozak and assembled everything myself as directed with acoustic material. I ran the set with original Advents through a Kenwood receiver....which I didn't fully understand from their directions, was internally wired in series. I loved the sound but in retrospect, the speaker sets were probably out of phase with each other all running at the same time.

I was in a band then as a drummer and I had my practice set in between the towers of speakers-worked out really well. Stupidly, when came time to move, I dumped the Bozaks and kept the Advents-I hope the Bozaks went on somewhere to make more splendid music reproduction, as they were a fine company and product.

Kevin

#4 soundminded

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Posted 17 March 2006 - 02:22 PM

Rudy Bozak was one of the pioneers of high fidelity. I met him briefly at a trade show. At that time he was very old and passed away shortly aftewards(hopefully not as a result of meeting me. :-) ) He marketed many variants of his basic idea but it was as I recall based on a 3 way 12" infinite baffle design. One interesting thing about it was that you could buy the enclosure and one set of drivers and then keep adding more of them as your budget allowed. I don't think anyone else had a similar marketing strategy. Personally, I thought the Concert Grand was an excellent sounding speaker which had a big clean open fairly accurate sound. They were usually paired with the best amplifiers available, McIntosh and Marantz. They were also expensive and large and beyond the budget of most people. The smaller units were less impressive to me.

#5 dynaco_dan

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 06:46 PM

>Anyone have any details about the making of bozak speakers.
>In a 1958 AUDIO MAGAZINE article, it was mentioned that only
>Bozak and KLH made their own cones and wound the their own
>voice coils. Also...what is the companies status today?


Hi there;

I've only seen raw Bozak drivers in a 2nd hand store.

The tweeters were made in Canada to R. T. Bozak's specifications if I remember the label on the them.

If I remember correctly, the B310's (Concert Grands)? were sort of the very best available in their day.
VERN

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#6 Andy

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 05:49 PM

Anyone have any details about the making of bozak speakers. In a 1958 AUDIO MAGAZINE article, it was mentioned that only Bozak and KLH made their own cones and wound the their own voice coils. Also...what is the companies status today?




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